Shining a light on 'cool stuff': meet Lower Elementary teacher Brian Lynch

IMG_20181030_143743_Bokeh.jpg

Brian Lynch came to Mountain Pathways in 2015 and has been a Montessori teacher for 14 years. He co-taught Primary East for two years before transitioning this year to Lower Elementary. When he's not teaching, he's a father and free-flowing artist, practicing kung-fu, music, and painting. During the week, he engages children in the Norwood House with his enthusiasm for teaching.

CONNECTION | “ I decided to become a Montessori teacher when I was around 28, and I realized how much I loved the kids of those first ‘parent’ friends. I recognized that I had an internal drive to be ‘impeccable’ in my interactions with these beautiful children. It was soon after that I learned of Montessori. Her philosophy connected with me, and I knew where my heart’s career was.”

COOL STUFF | “I love connecting with kids, being witness to their growth, and helping them find their love of subjects and confidence in their selves. I particularly like this age group [6 to 9 years old] because the kids are just at the age where things are connecting and their processing overload has calmed down to allow an ability to hear abstract information and be inspired into loving many diverse subjects. As a teacher, I love that it is part of my job to give impressionistic lessons, shining a light on really ‘cool stuff’.”

NOOK | '“Ideally, I would love to be outside, having an adventure, but I seem to stick more to enjoying my little corner of the world these days. My son, Sauren, is getting to the age in which new levels of freedom will once again be felt.”

LOVE OF LIFE | “Some people might not know that I’m a free flowing artist in my free time; in painting, music, and kung fu. My wish for all the children in the world would be to keep a healthy self-concept which I would define as a union between the ‘I can’ attitude and an all-round love of subjects… a love of life.”

MONTESSORI TIP | “For parents who want to implement Montessori more at home, I would advise them to know what your child can do, allow your child to do what they can do, and have your child do what they can do… in a patient, loving and observing way.”